4.26.2014

Haute Dogs: Hot Cuisine!

Right up front, I must admit I love hot dogs. There. I've said it. You may now un-friend me or ban me from the culinary community, but I have to be true to myself...

Also, I need to tell you that this post is a cookbook review, having received a copy of Haute Dogs, by Russell Van Kraayenburg, from Quirk Books. It will hit the bookshops next week - and, if you like hot dogs [spoiler alert], this book contains recipes for Chicago, Coney Island, Texas and Michigan Dogs, as well as modern concoctions such as The Danger, Vegan, Spicy Thai and Swedish Shrimp Dogs.

The book contains pretty much every regional dog recipe (47 hot dog recipes, in all), although we (in Tucson) are sad he didn't include our distinctive and incredible Sonoran Hot Dog. {insert sad face here...} Maybe it wasn't an oversight? Maybe he has a plan? Maybe there will be a sequel? Son of Haute Dogs?

When I was young, hot dogs meant I was headed to a baseball or football game with my father. To his dismay, I found the hot dogs more interesting than the games, although I really do like baseball.

Additional to game days, hot dogs stir fond memories of family barbecues, surviving on my own after college, and lunch breaks from my day jobs at the Albany Symphony Orchestra and the New York State Museum.

These days, if I am eating hot dogs, it means I am in IKEA and need a quick and cheap dinner after a long (and theoretically cheap) shopping excursion. Who can argue with 2 dogs for $1?

For today, though, let's head back to my lunch breaks in Upstate New York. Albany had quite a few lunch vendors on its downtown streets, selling soft pretzels, submarine sandwiches, gyros, or ice cream. I ignored all those and always went to Cathy's cart for a New York Dog.

The funny thing is, I didn't even know that a New York Style Dog was a 'thing' until I got this book. I just assumed that is what Cathy called them, as I had never had another like it.

A New York Style Dog is a griddled/pan-fried/steamed all-beef dog, served with onion sauce, spicy brown mustard, and sauerkraut on a bun. I usually had my dog with just the onion sauce. After several years of my whining and cajoling, Cathy finally told me how she made her onion sauce. The saddest admission in this post is that I lost the notes I took that day.

The happiest part of this post, is that Haute Dogs contains a recipe for onion sauce just like Cathy's!

In addition to these really great regional recipes, Haute Dogs also includes recipes for homemade hot dogs themselves (not sure I have the fortitude for that!), buns and lots of great condiments in addition to the onion sauce.

Do you have finicky kids (or adults) who only eat hot dogs? This might be just the book to expand their culinary world, with its fascinating and diverse array of offerings of this humble favorite. Heck, it might expand yours, too. It sure did mine!

Play ball!

~ David

My apologies to the NY Yankees. Love your dogs, but will always be a Red Sox fan!
New York Style Hot Dog
Minimally adapted from Haute Dogs

New York Style Sautéed Onions

Classic buns
All-beef hot dogs (I used locally made dogs from Double Check Ranch)
Spicy brown mustard
Sauerkraut (from High Energy Agriculture)


Make the onion sauce (recipe follow).


Split open a classic bun. Panfry an all-beef to dog on a flattop (griddle); during the last minute of cooking, lightly toast the bun by placing it on the dry side of the flattop. Place the hot dog on the bun. Add a slathering of spicy brown mustard to the dog. Top with a handful each of sauerkraut ad sautéed onions.


New York Style Sautéed Onions


2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 large white onions, thinly sliced (about 1 pound)
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon


Warm olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook onions with tomato paste and spices, stirring, until soft, translucent, and starting to brown on the edges, about 10-15 minutes. You may need a tablespoon or two of water to keep them from getting too dry. Serve immediately or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator of up to 3 days.


Makes about 2 cups. 


Disclaimer: While I was sent a review copy from the publishert, my opinions are my own and I was not required to write a positive review. 

 

41 comments:

  1. Really you eat hot dogs?? In all these years of friendship I had no idea... I will be ordering the book for sure.

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    1. Haha! Jill, I have many deep, dark secrets... and you will have such fun learning about them in the years to come!

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  2. Your sauerkraut looks special too. GREG

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    1. Indeed it was, Greg. GG is one of my favorite growers at the farmers market.

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  3. The Red Sox hat is a nice touch.:)

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    1. Thanks, Susana - I knew it was going to get the attention it deserves!

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  4. Neither my mother nor auntie can venture thru the big apple, or street fair, or LI Ducks ballgame, or anywhere else where they are available, without eventually having dog bun kraut and mustard accessory in hand. As for me, there was nothing better in a day of running around the city picking up just one more whatsis than a dirty water dog with extra kraut and grainy! And, when my brother and his then wife bought there first apartment in Jersey City, I do believe a key selling point was the Sabrett factory next door....

    Thank you SO MUCH for sharing a recipe that will salve my hot dog homesick blues!!

    Karin

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    1. Thanks, Karin - have you ever tried the onion sauce? Wow, do I love the stuff! And thinks for ignoring the Red Sox cap - I know that is tough for a Yankees fan!

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  5. Gotta be Sabrett's Hot Dogs to really be "officially" New York. That is what is at almost every corner cart in the City.Kosher and fabulous! Miss you in Albany Symphony, I think we were all eating Hot Dogs at the same time! Did you ever get up to Glens Falls to try the New Way Lunch's dogs? They are legendary and known locally as "Dirt Dogs" for the meat sauce they have. I have noticed that here in Upstate NY, meat sauces are more common than NYC style dogs.

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    1. Sabrett's aren't available here. Sorry! :) New Way Lunch is new to me - can;'t imagine when I will next be in Glens Falls but I will keep that in mind! Thanks, Suzo!

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  6. Hi David, loving those new York style onions. Every once in a while I pick up a hot dog at Costco's when I'm there and they are always great. Really have never had any other type. These sound good though.

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    1. Cheri - I have never had a Costco dog, but maybe I will have to try one next time I am there!

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  7. OMG hot dogs -you are banned banned banned from my lofty foodie presence :). Actually if I ever get to the US on holiday one of the first things I am going to try is a hot dog!

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    1. Thanks, Karen... it was nice knowing you! :) If you do get here for a holiday, let me know and I will send you to the best hot dog where you are traveling!

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  8. Hot dogs are one of my favorite things. Must be Northeast comfort food.

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    1. Thanks, Carol - glad you enjoyed the post and love hot dogs! I thought for sure you would comment on the Red Sox hat, though!

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  9. I'm not judging!! I personally don't like hot dogs but will eat one on occasion. The thing is, I didn't grow up eating them because we don't have any in Indian cuisine and that's what I ate mainly, the sausages in London were always almost pork and I couldn't eat them. The first time I ever ate a sausage was at my Jewish friends who had Kosher dogs! Nowadays, we eat them on BBQs or I'll make chilli dogs that my hubby loves. A whole book on dogs,...I probably don't need that but it's a good resource! The onion sauce sounds a really good though. Have you ever had Toad in the Hole? We have an onion gravy with the sausages in batter, so good. I have a recipe on my site if you what to try it, I think you'd like it!

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    1. The recipe's for Toad in the Hole, not the onion gravy!

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    2. I will definitely look at your Toad in the Hole recipe. Which reminds me of a Posh Nosh episode. Have you ever seen those little shorts on PBS? Brilliant! The onion sauce rocks. I just need to fin other uses for it!

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  10. I have a confession! I love the occasional hot dog too…. with mustard! Great post. Really enjoyed it.

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    1. Glad to know I am not alone, Liz! Thanks!

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  11. To bring you back to your New England roots...do you remember Flo's hotdogs in Cape Neddick, ME? Lines out the door all summer! You are not alone in loving a good dog!

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    1. Susan, I do remember those little mini dogs from Flo's - I only went there once, though, before she closed her doors.

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  12. On the very odd occasion I bust out and pick up a hotdog from Bunnings (similar to Home Depot) as they always have a charity stand on the weekends. A sausage, some caramelised onion, grated cheese and tomato sauce. Nothing special, just satisfying.

    I'm sure I've seen this Haute Dogs cookbook in bookshops here, though I've never picked it up to take a look.

    IKEA does hotdogs?

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    1. Yes, John, IKEA does hot dogs! They are very popular. And, sometimes, the not-terribly-special meals can be the most satisfying. I wonder why that is...

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  13. Thanks for the recipe David. I have to make this as I only eat the IKEA hot dog, or the Dutch hot dog which is greeeeat. Come to think of it I have to post the recipe for the Dutch hot dog!!
    This must be a great book, lucky you!
    xoxo

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    1. Magda - you should definitely post on the Dutch hot dog! I can't wait to find out what that is. If you need a good hot dog recipe, let me know!

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  14. That's great...even if I love the good food, sometimes it's also nice to have a fantastic hot dog or hamburger. Did not even know that there is some "literature" about the hot dogs lol! However, cuisine can be really flexible and you can make all the combinations you want....it's just a matter of creativity! :-)

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    1. This was the first book I have ever seen on hot dogs, Marco. There are so many different and creative version - I could have one a week for a year!

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  15. YES! I love hot dogs too, particularly ones with a German bratwurst/sauerkraut twist... if any market has a hot dog stand, I am the first one running over there digging coins from my pockets!! Love the sound of those New York onions. I often make fried onions for hot dogs but the cayenne and tomato paste sounds wonderful. I will try this recipe and think of you and Mark as I crack open a beer! Yay for classic street food :)

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    1. With all the street foods there are now, the hot dog does seem to get lost. But to me, Laura, they are the originals and l love them! I am also trying to think of other uses for the onion sauce...

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  16. D, I think we may be on the same brainwave. We bbq'd a couple days ago and the smoky smell from the grill made me wish we had good ol'fashioned hot dogs for dinner instead.
    I love these haute dogs. The tomato-onions, pickled onions, sauerkraut, the works. Probably will need a TUMS as I'm old now, but it'll be so worth it!
    I have a worldwide giveaway at the moment in honor of Mom to help save the bees. Please stop by when you can. xoxooxxo

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    1. Colette - I love that you are working to save the bees. Our niece studies bees, and I will share your post with her, too.

      And you are NOT old. I am old. :) And I didn't need tums for this meal at all!

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  17. My husband grew up in New York and thinks a hot dog must have onion sauce on it. If I had to choose one regional hot dog that I have enjoyed the most, I think it would be a Chicago dog with sport peppers on it. Growing up in Texas, a hot dog always had chili and finely chopped onions.

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    1. Karen - I think it is so much fun to find out all the different varieties of hot dogs out there. Now, when I travel, I am going to make sure I try all these different varieties.

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  18. I just found your blog through the Kitchen Lioness and I couldn't help but commenting this post.
    This is one of the recipes of my childhood! I used to beg my father to make these hot dogs - sometimes he would even use kidney beans with the onion, and I loved it even though I didn't really fancied beans! You cannot imagine how nostalgic I got with this post, I haven't eaten my father's hot dogs in many years!

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    1. Inês - your comment really made my day! It was so nice to be able to bring these memories back for you, and I hope you get a chance to make these hot dogs soon! Thanks for stopping by - come back soon!

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  19. Um, as a half American/half German I think hot dogs are in my genes... so I certainly will NOT unfriend you!

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    1. Fiona - I always think of you as 100% Italian - even thought I know that isn't true!

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  20. I love this post! It's funny about how strongly people feel about hot dogs. I did a post a while back (http://www.rieglpalate.com/red-hot-hot-dogs/) that got people talking. I'm going to check out this book soon.

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    1. Thanks, Nicole! I was surprised at the strong reaction, as well. I am off to check out your red hots now!

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