4.09.2016

And, Finally... Gelato

Weeks ago I told you I was going to make Meyer lemon gelato, but instead made lemon-lime posset because I had forgotten to freeze the ice cream maker insert.

I did make gelato the next day - or maybe it was the day after that - and it was really good!

Somehow, though, there was a time warp, and only now am I writing about it. Better late than never, though, right?

Yikes, I hope you can still get Meyer lemons! The season is almost over. If you can't, don't despair... (A shout out to neighbors Judy and Jeff for the Meyer lemon supply!)

When I need Meyer lemon juice out of season, I simply use a ratio of 2/3 lemon juice, to 1/3 orange juice - both fresh, of course. I like it a bit tart. If you want it sweeter, try a 50/50 blend. Also, I strain the juice because I don't like the texture of frozen pulp in my gelato.

The original recipe came from my sister-in-law, Becky, who got it from her lunch group in Gainesville, Florida. The women in her group sure can cook; I have gotten several recipes from them that have become favorites! As usual, I made a couple of changes to suit my tastes.

This - and just about any dessert - tastes better when served in a cobalt blue glass-lined silver coupe. A lovely set was a recent gift from my friend Benita, from her aunt's estate.

~ David

Meyer Lemon Gelato

2 tablespoons strained lemon juice
about 1 cup strained Meyer lemon juice
zest from two Meyer lemons (using a microplane)
1 cup caster or superfine sugar
1 cup milk
1 cup heavy cream
pinch sea salt

Place the 2 tablespoons strained lemon juice in a cup measure, and then fill the rest of the measure with strained Meyer lemon juice.

Combine the cream, milk, lemon juice, zest, sugar, and salt.  Using a wire whisk, mix until the sugar is dissolved and completely incorporated (the mixture should thicken some.)

Pour into the barrel of an ice cream maker; freeze following the manufacturer’s instructions. Scoop into a freezer container and freeze for 2-4 hours before serving.

Makes about 1 quart.


38 comments:

  1. Oh I have three meyer lemons left on my tree - maybe...but then the goblets - a perfect match!!!

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  2. This is next to make! I have some meyer lemons left that are looking pretty sad, must use them or lose them - gasp! I have already made your lovely posset, and lemon bars, and trying to find recipes that use more than a tablespoon... Thanks for the tip of using regular lemons and orange juice for future recipes.

    And, ohhhh, that bowl, David. L o v e l y !!!

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    1. I know you will love this, Cathleen - and, yes, it is hard to find a recipe that calls fro more than just a spoonful of lemon juice!

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  3. That dessert looks heavenly.

    My husband's grandmother made "ice cream" in an ice cube tray in the freezer, but no one in his family remembers how she did it. Is it possible she was making gelato? I never thought of that possibility.

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    1. Susan - There are quite a few recipes like Michael's grandmother used - semifreddo is an Italian version and I imagine there are many like it around the world. Gelato really needs to be churned to get the best effect.

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  4. Love the Meyer lemon substitution tip! Great idea, although, I am lost without having a stash of Meyer lemons ready to go! I have two trees now and sometimes can make them last into summer (not so lucky this year.)

    Your gelato has made my mouth water and so your job is done here! :)

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    1. Glad I did my job, Christina! Yes, we are lucky to have Meyers year-round, but they are already gone in many places.

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  5. David, this sounds lovely. I have a tiny Meyer lemon tree that produces about 6 lemons per year -- but, they're gorgeous and delicious. I love how the skin is so orange. Beautiful recipe.

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    1. The tree will grow, Valentina! One day you will have so many you won't know what to do with them! (#firstworldproblems!)

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  6. This looks so delicious and refreshing! And I love that blue coupe!

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    1. Thanks, Mimi - I was so lucky my friend gave them to me!

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  7. Yum!! This looks delicious! And that bowl is beautiful. I have one Meyer lemon I need to pick from my tree but I really hope I get more than one lemon for next year!

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    1. We had a one-lemon year on our tree two years ago - it was so sad, Caroline. Just imagine the debate on how to use that one!

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  8. No worries. There are still quite a few Meyer lemons hanging onto the branches of my tree just waiting for you to post this. GREG

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    1. Glad to know - they must've known it was coming!

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  9. I'd be all over this in a flash, David. You know, the gelato bars here in Sydney tend to only do lemon sorbet, rather than actual gelato. I'd really like to know why. I want lemon gelato!

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    1. The gelaterie in the States do the same, John - we just have to make the lemon gelato ourselves.

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  10. David, no Meyer lemons anywhere around here. And I have heard so much about them but never had a chance to taste them - I am seriously jealous and would love a taste of that lemon gelato right now...
    Herzliche Grüße an euch beide!
    Andrea

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    1. Do you ever get them, Andrea? The mixture of lemon and orange is pretty close, so you can get the idea. Hope all is well with you! Liebe Grüße, David

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  11. Wonderful post, David. I've done much of it -- even forgetting to freeze the canister (I have 2, BTW) -- but I've never made lemon gelato. I should because we all love lemon-flavored everything. And, yes, it's too late for me to get Meyer lemons but your substitution is a good one. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Okay, John - now I can admit that I, also, have two liners and both were not in the freezer! That is embarrassing, isn't it? I am so surprised that Meyer lemons don't get shipped for as long as they are available here. Bags of them in Trader Joe's yesterday...

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  12. You are one busy bee, David. I love that there's not cooking custard element to your recipe. I have little patience to stand at the stove, stirring constantly, then wait another 30 minutes for said custard to cool.
    I can't wait to try this recipe of yours! xoxo

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  13. Your gelato sounds great, I love all citrus flavored desserts.

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  14. I want to dive into a few of your pictures, David! Beautiful gelato and I'm certain is was delicious too :)

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  15. My Meyer lemon trees are my treasure and I love gelato. Your recipe looks fantastic and I will make it soon. I have a similar recipe I found many years ago that uses buttermilk instead of cream and milk . It is more of a sorbet than a gelato .

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    1. Gerlinde - this definitely has a nice creamy texture. Love it!

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  16. This was certainly worth the wait! It seems amazing to be able to go out and harvest citrus (or get it from neighbors). I just need to get my ASU daughter to make friends who have citrus trees (especially before school breaks).

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    1. It is a treat to grow citrus - and you really need to get your daughter to send you some! Phoenix has a much longer citrus season that Tucson, and (as it is warmer) more varieties grow there.

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  17. Looks yummy and beautiful. I wonder if mine will taste as good in my rather plain bowls! I've got the icecream maker in the freezer now!

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    1. Plain bowls? I have seen your bowls, Susan - you have some wonderful ones for this (or any) gelato!

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