7.16.2016

Rhymes with Tofuti

My friends at the Provence WineZine spent the better part of last month in Provence. It's a tough job, but somebody has to do it.

Naturally, having seen posts from them on a daily basis, I was reminded of our wonderful trip to Provence for my 50th birthday. I don't even want to think about how long ago that was...

I recall so many wonderful moments and I know you won't be surprised to know that most of them are connected to food.

We made visits to the markets on a daily basis, choosing produce, bread, cheeses, meats, spices, and sweets to take home.

I loved the meals we made at home, and those we had while on the road touring. Our day and meal at a goat farm - which served the most amazing chèvre - was one of the most memorable meals in my life. It was also one of the simplest. Salad. Jambon cru. Chèvre. Rosé.

Our lunch at the goat farm, Le Castellas, featuring Susan from the
Provence WineZine, Markipedia, and a very friendly goat.
There were also regional dishes I tried and loved. One of them was the traditional Clafoutis aux Cérises Noires.

Many people tell me that they want to learn how to make this dish but, before I share my recipe, let's work on pronouncing it.

Clafoutis kind of rhymes with "Tofuti." But not really. It would if you said it with an American accent (gasp!). Please don't.

It is really pronounced: CLAH-foo-TEE. Accents on the first and third syllables, not on the second.

Now that we have that out of the way, let's eat.

~ David

Clafoutis aux Cérises Noires

The traditional way to make this is to use the cherries whole WITH the pits. Having had a little too much dental work lately, and not wanting my friends to have any, I choose to pit the cherries.

softened butter, for the pan
3/4 cups milk
1/2 cup cream
2/3 cup sugar, divided
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 teaspoons brandy
pinch salt
1/2 cup flour
2 cups cherries
powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 350°F, and lightly butter a deep dish pie plate or ceramic casserole.

Whisk together the milk, cream, 1/3 cup sugar, eggs, vanilla, brandy, salt, and flour. Pour a 1/4-inch layer of the batter into the baking dish. Place in the oven until the film of batter sets in the pan – about 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and spread the cherries evenly over the batter. Sprinkle the remaining cup of sugar over the cherries. Pour the rest of the batter over the sugared cherries. Bake for about for about 45-50 minutes. The clafoutis will be done when puffed and brown, and a knife plunged in the center comes out clean.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar; and serve warm.

Serves 6-8.


52 comments:

  1. I love this dish! Do you think it needs to be served right out of the oven or can it cool to room temperature? I'm trying to decide if I want to make it for a dinner party. Thanks!

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    1. Good morning, Natasha! This dish is wonderful served at room temperature or hot out of the oven. Enjoy!

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    2. It is also wonderful straight out of the fridge for breakfast but rarely does it last until morning!

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    3. Towny - I think that is probably why I can't comment about it as a breakfast food. :)

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  2. I far prefer clafoutis room temperature, and like it best of all next day for breakfast! :-)

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    1. Even though you try to be anonymous, I know it is you, Mark! :) And I know you prefer your desserts for breakfast - I just like them at both times!

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    2. I agree with Mark! It's much better at room temp, far less "eggy" :)

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  3. I love this dish. I make a low carb version that I eat for breakfast (I like raspberries, which technically makes it NOT a clafoutis, but regardless.). That's how I like it. Noms.

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    1. Thanks, Jules - I love the idea of using raspberries! And, as you note above, Mark loves it for breakfast!

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  4. Beautiful dessert and it's trending at the moment! No less than three of my friends have posted pics of theirs in the past week ;) That lunch in Provence sounds absolutely perfect to me! Goat cheese has to be in my top ten!! YUM!!

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    1. I can't believe I actually posted something that is trending... :) Thanks, Christina! If you ever get a chance, you must go to that goat farm in Le Castellas!

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    2. You don't have to twist my arm!! ;)

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  5. Such a beautiful post, David. I adore clafoutis!

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  6. Our black raspberries are ripening perfectly this week, so we're gonna take advantage and make a version with them. Your "serves 6-8" will, however, become our "serves 2."

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    1. As I recall, our version served 2, as well! I bet it will be wonderful with your fresh black raspberries!

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  7. Ah. Calfoutis. Say clafoutis to me, and I begin to tear up. Mis-pronounce it and watch the tears flow. That’s because my mother had her very special way of pronouncing some words. Clafoutis was one of those words. She had a pretty good grasp of the French language, but she could not get the emphasis on the proper syllable in clafoutis. Of course there was no correcting her. She wasn’t the type of person who took criticism well. She would just stare at you blankly like she had no idea what you were talking about. So when she had a way of saying a word, well that’s the way a word would be said forever. Don’t get me started on schedule. I may start balling and never stop! GREG

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    1. That is so sweet, Greg. My mother was the same about vichyssoise. Still makes me smile/cry to this day.

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  8. I love clafoutis , it's such an easy and wonderful dish. I made it last week using raspberries and blueberries. Your recipe looks great. I made your shrubs using raspberries and blueberries. I love it.

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    1. Thanks, Gerlinde - raspberries and blueberries would be wonderful!

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  9. What a beautiful dish! Looks delicious, and your trip to Provence sounds lovely.

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    1. Thanks, Caroline - it makes me want to hop a plane and go again right now!

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  10. Was that your Mark saying he likes clafoutis at breakfast? So funny, but I'd never say no if someone offered me some of this in bed with a coffee!

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    1. It was, indeed, the one and only Markipedia. I will remember your words when you come visit - you might get the clafoutis, but maybe not in bed...

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  11. This post, especially the photos, brought me back to my two years living in France. Some of the happiest days of my life!

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    1. How fortunate are you, Frank! Where did you live? Sigh...

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  12. So simple and so sweet! I love France! Thank you for this pronunciation lesson and recipe!

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    1. You are most welcome, Cindy! It is really simple, and the funny thing is that it isn't too sweet!

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  13. That goat was definitely friendly, maybe a little curious too. Sounds like you have wonderful memories of your 50th birthdat trip. I can't think of a better way to celebrate.

    Had a little chuckle about your "anonymous" comment, David.

    Love this clafoutis, looks amazing!

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    1. Glad Mark's anonymous comment gave you a chuckle, Cheri! That meal is truly among the most memorable meals of my life. I would love to go again, and know I wouldn't be disappointed.

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  14. What do you do with the cream?

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    1. Wow - thanks for catching that. I just updated the recipe - you mix it in with the milk. My apologies! ~ David

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  15. Oh to be in Provence. How lovely. I tried one once leaving the pits in (having read it adds a nutty flavor), but found them too cumbersome! This recipe looks perfect. Delicious!

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    1. I know the pits have a nutty flavor - I can smell it when making my Italian cherry liqueur. But I am more afraid of breaking a tooth, so have learned to live without it in my clafoutis!

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  16. Hi David! Mmmm...one of my favourites! Love clafoutis and every time I make it for guests, they love it too.
    It's so easy but absolutely delicious. This cherry ones looks fantastic. I think I've made a cherry one a couple of times but my favourite is a pear one. I guess technically a pear one would be a flaugnarde not a clafoutis....but it's the same thing!
    Some of the simplest good is the best. I need to remember that more often when I'm tempted to get knee high in a recipe.
    I hope you and Mark are well.
    I'm wallowing in lack of motivation and inspiration lately. Hoping to snap out of it.

    xx

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    1. I love flaugnarde, too. Someone once told me the only true clafoutis is a cherry one. But, I think all fruits are good in this preparation! I am definitely of the mind that simplest is best - like you, I get into a convoluted recipe every once in a while and wonder why the heck I started it! I hope you feel better soon. xo, David

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  17. Such a brilliant and classic dessert, and just right for the summer too.

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    1. Thanks, Caroline! Glad you stopped by - just signed up for your posts. Everything looks wonderful there!

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  18. Whoa! What a thrill to be mentioned in an article about one of my favorite desserts from one of my favorite places on earth by one of my favorite people in the universe! I KNOW this CLAH-fou-TEE is wonderful and wish I had a big piece right now!

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    1. Thanks, Susan - it was really fun to go through all the photos from Le Castellas again, and I love that photo of you!

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    2. Thank you--me, too...that is I love the photo of me and wish it still looked like me! Confessing to the cook here, we made it TWICE, two days in a row! Delicious and easy!

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    3. Two days in a row is completely reasonable, Susan. Three begins to make one fear addiction! :) So glad you like it.

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  19. Hi David, thank you for the trip down memory lane. We had such a fun time together in Provence! What are your plans for your 60th?

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    1. Wow, Towny - thanks for pointing out my imminent aging! No plans yet... but France does appeal! How is it that I have almost no photos of you in Provence? Are the photographers always missing?

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  20. I made a peach and cranberry clafoutis a couple years ago and now I'm kicking myself for not putting some of this year's cherries into a cherry clafoutis. Wonder how frozen cherries would work (and yes, I completely agree with you on removing the pits)... The pictures from your trip are beautiful and I think food is a perfect focus for travel!

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    1. Hi, Inger - frozen cherries work really well! They might need to be drained a bit, though. Peach and cranberry is an interesting combo - I bet it was great!

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  21. This sounds like a great dessert, David, though I agree with your "no pits" variation. A few years ago, I watched a TV chef prepare a clafoutis and, intrigued, I set about making one, too. Mine tasted like cherries in scrambled eggs. How disappointing! I checked her website and the recipe offered there was different than the one she prepared. I'm guessing the post-production fairies had a hand in it. I remade the recipe and it was very good, although next time I'll follow yours. Maybe I'll serve it the next time I prepare your lamb khorma. :)

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    1. John - I am so happy that you are still thinking of my lamb khorma! I, too, have had really eggy clafoutis, and they might as well have been breakfast! I think you will like this.

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  22. David, it's been far too long since I've made clafoutis. Thanks for the reminder. I've always made it with pitted cherries. I think it's ridiculous to serve a dessert with cherry pits in it, especially when most of the people I'd be serving it to have never had it and would not be expecting pits! Oh and make mine room temperature, please.

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    1. Honestly, Jean, I cannot imagine that the cherry pits would really add that much flavor! And notes have been made... you (and many others) prefer room temperature!

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