9.01.2018

A Few of My Favorite Things

Shallots. Olives. Capers. Tomatoes. These are a few of my favorite things.

When you cook them together with some good olive oil and fresh thyme? An amazing ragoût.

Serve it with over seared salmon? A simple and sublime meal. It also works well as an accompaniment to pork, chicken, tuna, swordfish, tilapia, or…?

I wanted something rich, succulent, and comforting, yet not heavy. Especially for a hot August evening in the Sonoran Desert. I opted for salmon.

This was what I came up with the other night to pair with a very unusual rosé from Château Malherbe. You can read about the wine pairing on the Provence WineZine.

Enjoy!

~ David

Seared Salmon with Tomato-Shallot Ragoût

2 6-ounces wild salmon fillets
1/4 teaspoon Piment d’Esplette
1/4 sweet paprika
1/8 teaspoon salt


2 tablespoons full-flavored olive oil
3 ounces shallots, peeled and cut into chunks
3 ounces sweet cherry tomatoes
2 tablespoons capers, rinsed and drained
5 pitted kalamata olives, quartered lengthwise
leaves from 5 sprigs fresh thyme
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided


Heat the olive oil in small saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallots and tomatoes; reduce heat to medium-low and cook for 20-25 minutes, until shallots are soft and tomatoes have begun to pop.

While the shallots and tomatoes are cooking, wash and dry the salmon and place skin-side down on a plate. Mix the Piment d’Esplette, paprika, and salt in a small bowl, and gently rub the mixture into the flesh of the salmon, but not the edges. Set aside while you finish the ragoût.

Preheat the oven to 350°F/180°C. Add the capers, olives, and thyme to the shallot-tomato mixture and cook for 5 minutes longer. Remove from the heat and cover to keep warm.

Over high heat, melt 1 tablespoon butter in a skillet large enough to hold both fillets. When foaming has subsided, add the salmon (skin-side up) and sear for 1-2 minutes until golden brown. Turn the salmon skin-side down and place in the oven for 3-4 minutes.

While salmon is in the oven, return the ragoût to medium-low heat and stir in remaining tablespoon of butter.

Serve salmon skin-side down, spooning ragoût on the top and side of the fish.

Serves 2.



28 comments:

  1. A sort of "Salmon Puttanesca"! Those are a few of my favorite things, too, except for the salmon! Can you believe it? Yep, I don't like fresh salmon. The only way I like it is smoked! I would totally make this with another type of fish though. Looks lovely, David!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, pretty much Christina! Not surprised about the salmon (😉) but this is amazing on grouper and tuna and swordfish!

      Delete
  2. We make a similar ragout but use peppidews instead of shallots!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a great idea to use peppadews, Loretta! Will definitely try your version!

      Delete
  3. Any place to get Piment d’Esplette in Tucson. Looks delicious David.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sarah! Yes, you can get it at AJs. That is the only place I have seen it!

      Delete
  4. This looks so delicious David. The next time I cook salmon I will make it.

    ReplyDelete


  5. 'Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens . . . Have come backwards from Eslöv, Sweden to serve my next salmon dish with a lot of 'oomph' . . .

    ReplyDelete
  6. Capers and fish are a match made in heaven. We love our capers here in Sweden and one often finds a nice caper sauce lying under one’s cod or salmon. But, I've never tasted one quite like yours and I'm anxious to give it a try.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, Ron! It is one of the things I love most about Swedish cuisine!

      Delete
  7. I really wish I could add capers to my meals. Well, the meals that I cook for Dean and I. He hates them. So unfair!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It mudt be frustrating, John! Maybe you could just add capers to yours when you serve it!

      Delete
  8. A few of my favorite things too David! And pretty sure I have everything on hand--woot!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful composition David ! Again !

    ReplyDelete
  10. This looks like a delicious, light meal with wonderful flavors! I love capers. I'm putting this one on the menu for Evan and I this week! Can't wait :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Like Christina said, I was also thinking Puttanseca. And we these are definitely a few of MY favorite things too. Especially served this way -- all together. And I seem to instinctively serve it with fish, so your seared salmon sounds perfect to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know it sounds like Puttanesca, but it is so different... perhaps it is missing the tartness (and an anchovy or two?)... And, yes, it is so good on fish, Valentina!

      Delete
  12. Love capers and olives together. This looks like a terrific dish -- nice and summery, and with peppy flavor. Inspired stuff -- thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This dish goes really well with any number of cocktails, John! And, yes - perfect for summer!

      Delete
  13. David, those are a few of my favorite things as well, and I've never combined them all in one dish! This goes on the must-make list! (But thanks a lot--not--for getting that tune going in my head!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry about that, Jean! But, if it helps, I has been rolling around in my head since I wrote the post!

      Delete
  14. Do you know, those ingredients are some of my favourite things too! I love the simple flavours in this dish, perfect for autumn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I’m always amazed, Caroline, when people don’t like some of these things... but, as you can see from the comments above, we are in the majority!

      Delete

Thank you for taking the time to leave me a note - I really appreciate hearing from you and welcome any ideas you may have for future posts, too. Happy Cooking!

If you would like to receive follow-up comments, simply click the "Subscribe by E-mail" link to the right of the "Publish" and "Preview" buttons.